John Schoenherr is an American illustrator who was born in New York City, July 5, 1935. He is a graduate of Stuyvesant High School. He studied art at The Art Students League of New York with Will Barnet and at Pratt Institute. Much of the considerable and well-deserved attention he has received is based on his work as a science fiction illustrator. He is also very well known as a wildlife artist, children's book illustrator and scratchboard artist. Most of his illustration work uses this technique, and he was long known as the only commercial artist who specialized in it. Among the books he has illustrated are The Wolfling and Rascal by Sterling North, the latter of which received a Newbery Honor and The Illustrated Dune by Frank Herbert. This last grew out of his work for Analog magazine, especially under John W. Campbell, Jr. and Ben Bova. He illustrated the original magazine serializations of Dune for them, as well as the covers for Anne McCaffrey's "Weyr Search" and "Dragonrider," which were later revised into the novel Dragonflight. He won a Caldecott Medal for Owl Moon by Jane Yolen in 1988. His knowledge of zoology was very useful in creating alien creatures, and he also worked for paperback and hardcover SF publishers like Ace Books and Doubleday. He is an emeritus member of the American Society of Mammologists. A good and even more extensive biography and 'bibliography' of John can be found here.

The first illustration for the short story Weyr Search, in Analog magazine. This must depict the watchwher at Ruatha Hold. John Schoenherr's watchwhers and dragons are a law unto themselves and the last are immense but at least it is clear he read the story and made illustrations that fit the scenes in the the story.

© Copyright by John Schoenherr, all rights reserved.

All the pictures are scans from my personal copies of the Analog magazines (this one signed "Especially for Hans, Anne McCaffrey) and I wasn't prepared to really fold them open and break the spine, sorry.


The second illustration for the short story Weyr Search, in Analog magazine. This must depict the watchwher at Ruatha Hold. This piece aptly depicts Mnementh catching Lessa in his claws.

© Copyright by John Schoenherr, all rights reserved.


The third illustration for the short story Weyr Search, in Analog magazine. I suppose this is the Hatching scene, where Lessa encounters Ramoth.

© Copyright by John Schoenherr, all rights reserved.


The first illustration for the first part of the short story Dragonrider, in Analog magazine. This must be the the inert Nemorth, Ramoth's mother, lying on the Benden Weyr Hatching sands.

© Copyright by John Schoenherr, all rights reserved.


The second illustration for the first part of the short story Dragonrider, in Analog magazine. I think this must depict F'lar learning Lessa and Ramoth to fly and go between.

© Copyright by John Schoenherr, all rights reserved.


The third illustration for the first part of the short story Dragonrider, in Analog magazine. Dragons fighting Thread and getting killed and wounded!

© Copyright by John Schoenherr, all rights reserved.


The first illustration for the second part of the short story Dragonrider, in Analog magazine. This must be F'lar and Lessa, can't be anyone else!

© Copyright by John Schoenherr, all rights reserved.


The second illustration for the second part of the short story Dragonrider, in Analog magazine. Dragons flying, a gold and a brown maybe? Then it could be Lessa on Ramoth and F'nor on Canth on their reconnaisance flight to the long interdicted Southern Continent.

© Copyright by John Schoenherr, all rights reserved.


The third illustration for the second part of the short story Dragonrider, in Analog magazine. This clearly shows us a scene taken right from the book: big Mastersmith Fandarel inspecting the work of his reinvented HNO3 spraying device.

© Copyright by John Schoenherr, all rights reserved.


Copyright

Original cover art is shown here with no intention to violate the copyright, or any other right, of the original artist and in recompense we try to promote the artist and link back to his or her webpages and webshops if possible. Should anyone whose work is depicted on these Pern Museum Pages have any objection to seeing his works of art promoted here, a simple email will suffice to make your wishes known and we will act accordingly.